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Tastemakers: Daniel Siegel, M.D.

Los Angeles Times

by Nancie Clare

When Siegel was a med student, he was actively discouraged from finding out what patients were thinking. Now in his current practice as a clinical psychiatrist, executive director of Mindsight and codirector of the Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA, it’s the mind he is most interested in – specifically how it can be channeled to help the whole body.

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Brain Boosters

Newsweek

by David H. Freedman

Medicine may allow us to challenge our genetic inheritance and repair insults to the brain, whether as Alzheimer’s sufferers or moody, forgetful people and hazy thinkers. Some researchers are hoping to develop more natural methods that could have the same IQ-boosting effect in healthy people as drugs and other treatments. The adult brain has turned out to have a surprising ability to extensively reconfigure its connections through mental exercises. Most of us have parts of our brains that are relatively neglected, says Daniel Siegel, an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA Medical School, and we can restore them by techniques such as focusing on nonverbal cues when we’re conversing with other people, being more aware of what we’re thinking, and easing up on the multitasking. “When you do several things at once you tend to do them on autopilot, and fail to engage the parts of the brain that form strong neural connections,” explains Siegel.

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Attachment: The Key to Thriving Kids?

Education.com

by Danielle Wood

“What if you possessed a secret formula that made your child smarter, more independent, more secure – a kid capable of forming deep and loving relationships, showing compassion for others, and having a true connection to her parents? Well there is no secret formula, but there is a secret…Daniel Siegel, M.D., clinical professor of psychiatry at the Center for Culture, Brain, and Development at UCLA, and author of the seminal book “The Developing Mind” and “Parenting from the Inside Out,” specializes in the study of attachment. He describes it as something of a magic bullet when it comes to child development.”

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Mindsight at work: an interpersonal neurobiology lens on leadership

NeuroLeadership Journal

Dr. Daniel Siegel and Debra Pearce McCall

This article provides an overview of the framework of interpersonal neurobiology (IPNB) and its applications to leadership. Combining scientific rigor with an appreciation for subjective ways of knowing, IPNB is shaped by a wide array of sciences and emphasizes interdisciplinary inclusiveness. The framework emerged from consideration of consilient empirical findings from many disciplines, including neuroscience, complexity theory, relationship and developmental studies, social relations, examinations of consciousness, and studies of psychological and neuroplastic change.

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Mind Over Matters Through Meditation

O, The Oprah Magazine

by Catherine Guthrie

“Relaxation is good, but it doesn’t provide the physiological changes you see in mindfulness practice,” says Daniel J. Siegel, MD, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine and author of The Mindful Brain. Even better, says Siegel, there’s no need to log hours on the meditation cushion.” The brain responds to repetition with more gusto than it does to duration,” he says. . . “Just as people practice daily dental hygiene by brushing their teeth, mindfulness meditation is a form of brain hygiene – it cleans out and strengthens the synaptic connections in the brain.”

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Postcard: New York City

TIME Magazine

by Belinda Luscombe

“They’ve played Vegas, Tokyo, and Chicago. Now the Blue Man Group faces a tougher crowd. The guys with blue heads have opened a school. . .It may sound like a theme park, but the founders worked closely with education experts, including British creativity guru Sir Ken Robinson and UCLA’s Daniel Siegel, to create the curriculum.”

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The Neural Buddhists

The New York Times

by David Brooks

“Researchers now spend a lot of time trying to understand universal moral intuitions. Genes are not merely selfish, it appears. Instead, people seem to have deep instincts for fairness, empathy and attachment. . . If you survey the literature (and I’d recommend books by [Andrew] Newberg, Daniel J. Siegel, Michael S. Gazzaniga, Jonathan Haidt, Antonio Damasio and Marc D. Hauser if you want to get up to speed), you can see that certain beliefs will spread into the wider discussion.”

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The Adolescent Brain

Dr. Phil

featuring Dan Siegel

Dr. Phil talks with Dr. Dan Siegel, associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, member of the Dr. Phil Advisory Board and author of the book, The Mindful Brain. “In The Mindful Brain,” says Dr. Phil, “you [Dr. Siegel] talk about the fact that when the yelling starts, there’s a part of the brain that goes offline, just shuts down.”

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Of Love and Money

The New York Times

by David Brooks

“If there’s one thing that leaps out of all the brain literature, it is that, as Daniel J. Siegel puts it, ’emotion serves as a central organizing process within the brain.’ Kids learn from people they love. If we want young people to develop the social and self-regulating skills they need to thrive, we need to establish stable long-term relationships between love-hungry children and love-providing adults.”

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Mindsight. Dan Siegel Offers Therapists a New Vision of the Brain

Psychotherapy Networker

by Mary Sykes Wylie

“In 1999, a few months after child psychiatrist Daniel Siegel’s book The Developing Mind: Toward a Neurobiology of Interpersonal Experience was published, Siegel received an e-mail, purporting to be from a representative of Pope John Paul II, asking him to come to the Vatican to talk to the Pope. Thinking the e-mail was a prank, Siegel ignored it–why would the Pope invite an expert on the neurobiology of childhood attachment over to the Vatican to schmooze?” (September/October 2004 Issue)

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An Audience with the Pope

Los Angeles Times

by Deanna Welch

“When Galileo discovered that the earth was not the center of the universe, the Catholic Church condemned him as a heretic. For Santa Monica scientist Daniel Siegel, his recent visit with Pope John Paul II went a little differently. After Siegel, a Harvard and UCLA-trained child psychiatrist, wrote a book on the development of the brain, papal officials called him to the Vatican to laud him for his achievements.”

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